ATCA Awards were first introduced in 2008 and each year are presented to individuals and/or organisations that have provided dedicated and innovative leadership, thus enhancing the TC model of treatment for alcohol and other drug issues.  These comprise five categories:

  • ATCA Recognition Award
  • Significant Contribution Award – Individual
  • Significant Contribution Award – Program or Intervention
  • First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award – Organisational Award
  • Excellence in Research and Evaluation Award 

ATCA Award Catergories

ATCA Recognition Award
This award recognises the individuals who have made a contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia over a period of ten years or more. The goal of this Award is to provide public recognition of the dedicated contribution by individuals to the Therapeutic Community movement, by a staff member or volunteer.

ATCA Individual Award
This award recognises the individuals who have made a significant contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia over a considerable period of time. The goal of the Significant Contribution: Individual Award is to acknowledge and publicly recognise the exceptional work done by people who have worked tirelessly over a number of years to promote and develop the therapeutic community approach to treatment within the sector.

ATCA Significant Contribution Award
This award recognises an exemplary or commendable contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia made by a program or intervention. Any TC treatment provider or intervention is eligible.

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award
This award recognises organisations that have made a contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia by way of innovation and forming Partnerships that make Therapeutic communities culturally safe and relevant to first nation’s people. 

The goal of this Award is to provide public recognition work done to include first nations peoples in the delivery of Therapeutic Community programs either by way of innovation or the formulation of partnerships that directly benefit First Nations residents.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation Award
Therapeutic Community research is essential to the development of effective and informed strategies to improve the lives of clients and residents accessing TC services and programs.  This award recognises the individuals, research teams and TCs that have contributed to evidence-based research and evaluation of TC services and programs.

Awardees in the category of ATCA Recognition Award receive a certificate, presented at the annual ATCA Conference or Symposium.

Winners in other categories receive an engraved glass trophy, presented at the annual ATCA Conference or Symposium.

ATCA Award Guidelines
Eligibility

  • The awards are only open to current members of ATCA and may include other organisations outside the membership with which ATCA organisational members have partnered
  • Nominations should be completed on the appropriate form for each category and all relevant sections of the nomination form(s) should be completed
  • Each nomination is restricted to one category
  • Should a program be nominated in more than one category by different nominators, clarification will be sought from the nominee as to the category in which they wish their nomination to be judged
  • To be eligible for nomination in the service, program or intervention category, the service, program or intervention is required to be in operation during the awards period
  • To be eligible for nomination in the individual category, the individual is required to be employed by the nominating agency/organisation at the time of nomination and when the awards are presented
  • Each nomination requires the endorsement of the Director/Chief Executive Officer of the identified agency/organisation and nominee
  • Any additional information (attachments) must accompany the appropriate nomination form(s) or be mailed to ATCA at the advertised address and be received by the advertised closing date

Judging

  • Nominations will be assessed by a panel of people appointed by the ATCA Board to judge each award
  • Awards will be judged according to the criteria outlined for each of the award categories
  • More than one award may be granted in each of the main categories, and all eligible nominees for the Recognition Award will be presented with a Certificate of Recognition
  • The judging panels also reserve the right to award a Certificate of Commendation for finalists in the Individual and Organisational categories

Terms and conditions

  • No feedback or discussion will be entered into regarding nominations and award results
  • Nominations can only be made in one category for an individual, service, program or intervention
  • Nominations must address each judging criteria. Applicants that fail to do so will not be considered
  • Nominees must agree to be nominated
  • All nominations, including any attachments, become the property of the event organisers (ATCA)
  • Event organisers reserve the right to publicise all nominations and entrants may be asked to participate in media interviews

Dr Lynne Magor-Blatch
Executive Officer
Australasian Therapeutic Communities Association

PO Box 464
YASS NSW 2582
M:+61 (0)422 904 040
E: atca@atca.com.au

______________________________________________________________________________________

2019 ATCA Award Winners

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award

In 2019 ATCA this award was presented to: The Glen, an Aboriginal Community Controlled Alcohol and Drug, Modified TC for men experiencing alcohol and drug dependence.  The Glen is located on the beautiful Central Coast of New South Wales, sitting on 32 acres of open and pristine bushland, which clients describe as calming and tranquil. 

The Glen was established in 1994 and has been a shining example of the triumph of the Koori and the human spirit for the past 24 years. The program is led by five strong Indigenous women who have been personally touched by the effects of drugs and alcohol and are all extremely passionate about the work which the program is undertaking.  In 2019, after a planned campaign, their work was recognised by the Federal Government with the awarding of a $9 million grant to establish the first Aboriginal Community Controlled TC in NSW for Women only.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

Goldbridge; Girija Dadhe, Counsellor and Psychotherapist; and Cathy Bettman, Senior Lecturer, Australian College of Applied Psychology, who were the recipients of the 2019 award, formed a three-way partnership with the aim to investigate the lived experiences of adult crystal methamphetamine users in Australia, to examine how participants became dependent, what factors maintained this dependency, and what were the most significant adverse effects of this drug on different domains of their lives. 

Although this was a small study, it provides a rich account of the complex and multiple factors leading to crystal methamphetamine use, the aftermath of using this drug, and recovery from it. The study points towards further research on different demographic groups among the Australian population, such as young adults, women, and gay men and women/to understand their experiences and specific treatment needs.

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

This award recognises an exemplary or commendable contribution to the Therapeutic Community movement in Australasia made by a program or intervention.  The criteria for the award is based on current best practice; effectiveness on a range of measures, including the improvement of social and psychological functioning; and evidence that it is making a meaningful contribution.

The 2019 winner of this award is Wandoo Therapeutic Community, a partnership between Cyrenian House and the Department of Justice, providing WA’s first dedicated Alcohol and other Drug Therapeutic Community for women in a prison setting.  Wandoo TC focusses on offering a safe, healthy, supportive and respectful environment where women can make positive, lasting changes.

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an Individual

This award recognises the individuals who have made a significant contribution to the Therapeutic Community movement in Australasia over a considerable period of time. 

In 2019, ATCA recognised the work of two individuals whose contribution to the development and growth of the TC model has been significant. 

David Scott, Manager Rehabilitation Services, Windana Drug and Alcohol Recovery,

commenced working within Windana as a Mental Health Registered Nurse and Manager of Residential Rehabilitation Services in 2012 after working in the AOD sector both internationally and in Australia.  He has a long list of achievements and has forged and maintained links locally, nationally and internationally – particularly with Phoenix Futures in Glasgow.

His commitment to Community as Method, ongoing improvement and innovation has had a significant positive impact on residents and staff. He personifies the TC model to both staff and residents in his daily work practices and is a consistent, measured and caring leader. 

Gerard Byrne, member of ONE80TC Board and State Manager for The Salvation Army AOD Services in NSW / ACT and QLD has spent the past 30 years working in the AOD field.  Gerard has worked in the private and government AOD sectors for 11 years, providing a range of specialist assessment / referral, intervention and case management services.

Under his guidance, the services within what was known as the Salvation Army’s Eastern Territory have gone from strength to strength – embracing the Therapeutic Community model of treatment and developing a range of award-winning programs.  These programs have been continually expanded and developed to include programs for men and women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, people with comorbidity and trauma presentations and families. 

ATCA Recognition Award

In 2019, twenty-seven awards were made to people who have provided more than 10 years’ service to the TC movement in Australia and New Zealand. ATCA congratulates the following people:

  • Brett Foster – for more than 15 years service with The Buttery.
  • David Dalton – for more than 10 years service with The Buttery. 
  • Jenny McGee – for more than 10 years service with The Buttery.
  • John Kerr – for more than 10 years service with The Buttery. 
  • Larissa McClelland – also with The Buttery for over 10 years.
  • Hayden Bowen – Case Worker with Odyssey House Victoria’s Circuit Breaker Program.
  • Haydn Cooke – from Odyssey House Victoria’s Circuit Breaker Program.
  • Keir Larter – Assistant Manager of the Circuit Breaker Program, Odyssey House Victoria. 
  • Krystal Cryer – Case Worker with Odyssey House Victoria’s Circuit Breaker Program.
  • Kyohei Fujiie – Duty Worker in the Odyssey Circuit Breaker Program.
  • Brett Kessey – member of the Karralika Program’s staff since 2004.
  • Joseph Tandl – a member of the Karralika Program’s therapeutic community team ince 2007.
  • Kate Hillas – Case Manager in the Karralika Program’s Adult TC since 2004.
  • Kaylene Rose – a member of the Night Supervisor team at Karralika Programs since 2005.
  • Kelly Connell – a member of the Karralika Program’s staff since 2007.
  • Michael Saad – a member of the Night Supervisor team at Karralika Programs since 2005.
  • Troy Kitto – Centre Manager at One80TC, has been with the organisation for 10 years.
  • Zeke Webb-Pullmancommenced with Goldbridge in a student role in 2009 and was appointed to a staff position in 2011.
  • Patrick Williams has been a Night and Weekend Supervisor with Cyrenian House Rick Hammersley Centre Therapeutic Community for the past 12 years. 
  • Sally Saunders – has been a Counsellor Educator at the Cyrenian House since 2007.
  • Carolyn Stubley – is the Nurse Manager for WHOS, overseeing Nursing staff and a range of programs.
  • Chris Claire – has been working for WHOS Najara since its opening 14 years ago.
  • Gaye Byron – is the Clinical Nurse Manager for WHOS Rozelle.
  • Kate Daley – works with staff and residents in the WHOS Gateway service.
  • Mahesh (Sunanda) Manandhar – has worked at WHOS Najara for over 10 years.
  • Melissa Thorpe – joined WHOS as a Community Support Worker 12 years ago at the Najara TC.
  • Susie Xu – Accounts and Payroll for We Help Ourselves (WHOS). 

Our congratulations and appreciation for the work which you have all done over the past decade in supporting residents in our TCs and in your commitment to the TC and community as method.

20 years’ Recognition Awards

Therapeutic Community staff are well known for their longevity and passion to the TC Model.  In 2019, ATCA publicly recognised colleagues who have made a dedicated contribution to the TC movement for 20 and 30 years.  These awards recognise dedicated service over a significant period of time, often in a variety of capacities and in more than one organisation in Australasia or internationally.

  • Roz Holmes has provided 25 years of dedicated service to The Buttery in Administration and Intake, providing supportive interaction between staff and residents.   Her endearing personality has been, and remains, a fixture of Buttery lore. 
  • Dawn Bainbridge is a passionate advocate of the TC Model, and member of the Karralika Programs’ leadership team and quality committee.  She has worked since 1998 in  senior roles across residential and community services, and is now Program Manager of Karralika Adult and Family Programs.
  • Ian O’Brien has been employed as a Night and Weekend Supervisor at the Cyrenian House, Rick Hammersley Centre Therapeutic Community since 1999.  He has an amazing strength of character and a strong belief in and practical application of Community as Method.  Ian provides leadership and stability to night and weekend staff and his signature crisp white shirts are an iconic part of the Rick Hammersley Centre TC.
  • Linda Santiago has been a valued member of staff at the Cyrenian House Rick Hammersley Centre TC since 1999 and is the Senior Counsellor Educator in the Saranna Women and Children’s Program.  She began her journey as a student on placement, and has had multiple and varied part time and full time roles including Welfare Worker, Senior Counsellor, Saranna Outreach Worker and Clinical Coordinator. She has enriched the service provided to Saranna residents.
  • Des Walsh has been with WHOS for more than 20 years and currently manages both Gunyah, a position he took up in 2001, and Gateway, which he added to his portfolio in 2017.
  • Lyn Roberts commenced at Aspell House, a small TC in Wellington, NZ and six years later she moved to Higher Ground in Auckland, NZ.  She started with WHOS at New Beginnings and has since been employed with WHOS for more than 22 years. She currently manages the WHOS Opioid Substitution Treatment residential programs.

30 years’ Recognition Awards

  • Roy Dennett has been groundsman, handyman and support driver at The Buttery TC for 30 years, with many stories to tell from The Buttery’s humble beginnings.  He is always up for a chat with staff and residents and has provided dedicated service over a long period of time.
  • Garth Popple has held the Executive Director role at WHOS for over 25 years. Prior to this he held the positions of General Manager, Board Member and Accounts Officer dating back to 1981. All in all – covering 35 years in the TC field. Garth is a founding board member of ATCA and has held positions of President and Chair.  He is currently in his second elected term as Deputy President of the World Federation of Therapeutic Communities. 
  • Kerry Fitzroy commenced at Karralika Programs over 30 years ago as the Child Care Director in the Family Program.  During her time with Karralika, she has undertaken further study and has managed several programs, including the TC’s Adult and Family Programs, and is currently Program Manager of Community-based services.  She remains driven by client outcomes and quality services, she represents the organisation on several committees and has a strong commitment to staff and residents. 
  • Eric Allan’s contribution to TCs in Australia has been enormous over his 30 years at Odyssey House Victoria. Initially working with young people, he has been the Executive Manager of Residential Services at Odyssey House Victoria for almost 20 years, enhancing the Lower Plenty TC, establishing the award-winning Circuit Breaker program in North East Victoria in 2005, and now establishing a new TC in Bairnsdale. He has served as a board member and past chair of ATCA, and his expertise is regularly called on by government and other residential programs around the country.
  • Lynne Magor-Blatch commenced work at the ley Community in Oxford, UK in 1974 – having first completed a period of training at Alpha House, Portsmouth. She has held a number of positions in TCs in Australia and the UK, notably with Karralika over a 14-year period, commencing in 1988, and has been the Executive Officer of ATCA since 2009.  She is currently a member of the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities.
  • Janet Woolley was the Operations Manager at WHOS for 28 years and retired from that position in 2017. Janet now works part-time on the Executive Team as a Consultant assisting the CEO and board of directors and is an important member of the admin team.
  • Trevor Hallewell first began supporting WHOS over 30 years ago as a volunteer Board Member over an 18-year period, serving in various roles including Vice President. For the past 14 years Trevor has been the Manager of the Najara program, Sunshine Coast.  His contribution has seen the recognition of WHOS as a major TC player in Qld.

ATCA also honoured two others whose work in the United States and internationally has served to expand, develop and promote the TC model.  They have done amazing work and we were privileged to have them as our keynote speakers during this conference. 

  • Naya Arbiter began at Amity in 1981, although her roots in the TC movement go back many years before to Synanon. She has been responsible for the total transformation of this organisation and its recognition nationally and internationally as one of the most innovative and effective.  She has developed restorative paradigms for those marginalised through addiction, poverty, racism, sexism trauma and violence. She has been recognized for the development of pro-social strategies for people that represent populations that have confounded the mainstream.
  • Rod Mullen began his career in the therapeutic community in 1967 with Synanon Foundation. During his career he has developed and implemented TCs with adolescents, women and children, native Americans, and for men and women under criminal justice supervision both those incarcerated, and those in community-based settings. He been a consultant to many organisations in the US, and several in other countries. 

The cumulative years of service and commitment by those who have received Recognition Awards this evening, amounts to many hundreds of years – and during that time thousands of people have entered and succeeded in their treatment journey.  We congratulate and honour you tonight.

______________________________________________________________________________________

2017 ATCA Award Winners

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award

In 2017 ATCA honoured two of its members in this category:

  • Odyssey House Victoria Women’s Koori Justice Program aims to “close the gap” for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples seeking support and intervention for addiction and associated issues. Initial successes in the program’s Circuit Breaker program showed 20% of the population were Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, and these residents were making up 25% of program completions. This compared with 2% Aboriginal engagement in all other programs across the organisation.

Consultation with Aboriginal community elders and the employment of suitably qualified and respected individuals, lead to the development of an Aboriginal Advisory Group and Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group, ratified in 2013, and in 2017, the organisation has submitted its “Stretch RAP”.

The organisation has collaborated widely, they have engaged in professional development and addressed a range of AOD health related issues and have increased the number of Aboriginal service users across the whole organisation.

  • Goldbridge and The Henderson first established a partnership in 2014, which included individual mentoring sessions to identify strengths and awareness for the future. This was further developed in 2016 to provide a unique support program to First Nation’s people leaving prison and in 2017, this partnership has further expanded through the work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are undertaking sentences within Gatton Correctional Facility, linking them with the TC’s many services for support for AOD issues on release.

The establishment of an Advisory Group has assisted in this work, providing objective clinical and program advice to ensure residents are receiving culturally secure advice and support.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

  • WHOS; Illawarra Institute for Mental Health, University of Wollongong; and NDARC, University of New South Wales formed a partnership across three organisations, including two university-based research institutes, to improve the capacity of people living with co-occurring mental illness, establishing a program of research at the commencement of the project. The longitudinal action research designed study aimed to:
  1. Identify the capacity of TCs to address co-occurring mental illness; and
  2. Identify and articulate implementation strategies that can guide improvements in the way that TCs respond to mental illness comorbidities.

Throughout the study, the group addressed a number of secondary outcomes including identification of health needs, such as smoking, healthy lifestyles and health literacy.  The team has now completed seven annual reviews across the 9-year project.  The use of the DDCAT has shown the organisation is Dual Diagnosis Capable, and is a world-first in the TC context, leading to both publications and conference presentations.

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

In 2017, after due consideration, the judges agreed to highly commend a program that has made a long-term commitment to Harm Reduction, and to the education and promotion of wellbeing, healthy lifestyle and harm reduction initiatives across the six TCs that come under the organisation’s umbrella:  

  • The WHOS Harm Reduction Program has made a progressively expanding commitment to harm reduction commencing in 1986 in step with the Commonwealth Government’s Harm Minimisation approach to the Drug Strategy. Education is essential to ensure the message of safe drug use and safe sex is being received by the clients accessing the organisation’s services. There is an emphasis on overdose prevention and Harm Reduction Workers are allocated to each service and nursing staff oversee onsite clinics, liaising with community GPs, Sexual Health Services and BBV services.

Significant Contribution to Therapeutic Community Organisational Development –  Individual Award

In 2017, we recognised the work of one individual whose contribution to the development and growth of the TC model within his own organisation has been significant:

  • Brian Holt, Therapy and Operations Manager, Odyssey House New South Wales has been working in Odyssey House residential services for the past 25 years. He is a senior graduate of the residential program who commenced his employment with Odyssey in a therapist role in 1992. In 1996, he was appointed to the role of Coordinator at the Admissions and Referral Centre, and after 9 years moved to the position of Manager of the Odyssey House Admissions and Referral Centre and Withdrawal Unit.  In 2005, the Withdrawal Unit was presented with the Excellence in Treatment Award at the National Awards.  In 2010, with a number of organisational changes being made, the recipient of this award moved into a new position overseeing three departments across two treatment sites and in 2015, he assumed a new role managing the Therapy department.

Brian demonstrates his ongoing commitment and support to residents in treatment as he embraces the ethos of the Therapeutic Community with integrity and passion.  He is a living inspiration to Odyssey House staff and residents and over the years has provided support to approximately 15,500 clients.

Honorary Life Membership

In 2017, the ATCA Board agreed to expand the ATCA Affiliate membership category and establish Honorary Life Membership, which may be granted to an individual in recognition of commitment and services rendered to the Association and its membership.

Each nomination for Honorary Life Membership must be considered on its merits and the following principles considered in granting Honorary Life Membership:

  • Honorary Life Membership is a great honour.
  • It is not considered as a competitive process.
  • Nominees must be considered individually and on their personal attributes, achievements, commitment and contribution to the Therapeutic Community model and to the Association and its membership.
  • Honorary Life Membership is reserved for those whose contribution goes beyond the ordinary for an extended period of time.

In 2017, ATCA honoured two individuals who have had long and active membership of ATCA and the ATCA Board.  They have demonstrated significant contribution to the Association and in the national, state and territory arenas that has furthered the position of the Association and its membership.

Barry Evans and James Pitts were honoured for their significant and considerable contribution to the Association and its members over more than 30 years.

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

2016 ATCA Award Winners

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award

  • Drug and Alcohol Services Association (DASA) Alice Springs Indigenous Outreach Program.
    Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

2016 was the first year this award was presented, and judges congratulated all nominees for their high standard of work in this area.  Two of the nominations stood out and were considered a credit to the vibrant work that is happening within ATCA.  Both organisations demonstrated and sustained an impressive and varied amount of research.  Both nominations are persuasive in terms of narrative and story, as well as empirically robust.  Overall, their client work and research amount to a formula for winning hearts and minds.  The case for the awards is strong and finely presented.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

  • The Salvation Army Recovery Services and Illawarra Institute for Mental Health, University of Wollongong Research Partnership Executive Team: Mr Gerard Byrne, Major Rick Hoffman, Prof Frank Deane, and Dr Peter Kelly.
  • Highly CommendedHigher Ground Research Committee, in association with Julian King Associates

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

  • The Endeavour Dual Diagnosis Bridge Program
  • Highly Commended: Cyrenian House for the development and implementation of the Residential Pathways Program

Special Award for Leadership and Innovation

  • James Pitts

James has provided leadership and innovation to the TC sector over more than 32 years.  He has been a giant in our field, who has made a significant contribution to the lives of over 30,000 people.  The list of committees, Boards and expert groups on which he has served is long – and he has received a number of honours and awards over his long career.  He was a founding member of ATCA and has significantly expanded the benefit of the Therapeutic Community environment for people seeking recovery from addiction.

He has been a long-time advocate of the Therapeutic Community model of treatment and is highly regarded for his innovation and expertise in this field.  We will miss him as he retires from the sector, although we hope this will herald a new opportunity for him to support others within the sector to maintain fidelity in the TC model in their own services.

In 2016, ATCA was proud to honour someone who has an outstanding list of contributions over a lifetime of achievement.

 ___________________________________________________________________________________

2015 ATCA Award Winners

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

In 2015, the judging panel agreed to award two nominees in this category:

  • The WHOS New Beginnings Program has a demonstrated history of utilising and building best practice for women specific AOD work, using group work, supportive counselling, women’s health support and education, stress management skills development and referral.

Relationship issues, parenting, self-esteem building, social and communication skills, assertiveness skills training and boundary setting are all important areas for this TC service, which can accommodate up to 24 women at any given time.

  • The Alcohol and Drug Treatment Courtproject is an innovative and collaborative therapeutic jurisprudence pilot project, which has been established between the New Zealand Ministry of Health and Ministry of Justice. The treatment component is accomplished through a strong network between three providers: Odyssey Auckland as Lead Provider, Higher Ground and the Salvation Army. The network has a strong working relationship with the court.

From a treatment perspective, the network between the providers comprises dedicated case management and peer support, and a wrap-around model of support which ensures continuity of care in an individualized format.

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an Individual

In 2015, the Awards Committee made two awards in this category:

  • Rawiri Pene is a fantastic ambassador for the therapeutic community treatment movement and his work has been significant in propelling Higher Ground (Auckland, New Zealand) forward in working towards a fully bi-cultural program. In addition to his work at Higher Ground, Rawiri also provides the Pou Oranga role for the Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Court Network. In this role, he plays a significant part in the reduction of Maori being missed by the system and ending up in prison. He works tirelessly with many organisations to help Maori and others gain access to appropriate treatment.
  • Lance Jefferys works with the Department of Corrections, Hawkes Bay Regional Prison. From the commencement of his association with the therapeutic model of treatment, Lance has had a passion for the TC as a method of treatment within the prison setting.

His achievements are many and include: Implementation of a 60 beds Drug Treatment Unit (DTU) in collaboration with CareNZ staff; and a 6 months TC Program for Mainstream Prisoners with addiction problems; Joint proposing and opening of the 30 bed Short Term Intensive (STI) DTU TC in July 2012 for segregated prisoners; Stimulated, initiated and facilitated Staff in learning about the model and making it a daily practice; Integration of three circles (Corrections, CareNZ, and Prisoners) on a daily basis; Supporting colleague PCOs in how to facilitate and lead a TC unit from Corrections’ point of view; Using the TC model to stimulate and motivate prisoners towards change; and Using creativity, boundaries and working together with staff and prisoners.

 ___________________________________________________________________________________

2014 ATCA Award Winners

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

In 2014, the judging panel awarded two nominees in this category and highly commended a third:

  • TheRick Hammersley Centre Therapeutic Community for Improved AOD Treatment Services to GLBTIQ Consumers was highly commended as a program that is making a real difference in breaking down the barriers by creating a culture which fosters continuous quality improvement through staff and consumer participation. This includes building a culture within the organisation that supports GLBTIQ people both at a governance, human resource, and program element levels.
  • WHOS Opioid Treatment Programand The Rick Hammersley Centre Mixed Gender Program and Madjitil Moorna Choir of Aboriginal Reconciliation were jointly awarded for their Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia.
  • A number of TCs are now embarking on the important program area of combining medically assisted treatments within the TC environment. The WHOS Opioid Treatment Programis acknowledged as the leader in this area of treatment, operating two TCs – the WHOS Residential Treatment of Opioid Dependence (RTOD) stabilisation program and the WHOS Methadone to Abstinence Residential (MTAR) reduction program. Expansion of OTP services in 2013 included the Newcastle Day Program, family and aftercare support and onsite dispensing of OST. WHOS OTP Services have been at the in-service provision since 1999.
  • The Rick Hammersley Centre Mixed Gender Program and Madjitil Moorna Choir of Aboriginal Reconciliation was also recognised within this award category. The Madjitil Moorna Choir has been established to develop Partnerships to enable Aboriginal People to connect back to Community.

This innovative partnership provides an avenue for Aboriginal People seeking treatment for their AOD issues to connect back into community in healthy, life affirming ways. Aboriginal residents who attend the choir learn how to sing in Noongar language, perform at public events, and can take up administrative and coordinating roles within the choir upon completion of treatment.

Lead by award-winning Aboriginal songwriters, Madjitil Moorna has performed at major cultural events throughout metropolitan and regional Western Australia. The most recent performance by Aboriginal People in treatment at the TC with Madjitil Moorna was at the 2014 Perth International Arts Festival and at St Georges Cathedral for the NAIDOC Week celebrations.

Significant Contribution: Individual Award

In 2014, this award was made to three people who have made a significant contribution to the TC movement in Australasia over a considerable period of time:

Barry Evans has had a long association with the ATCA and The Buttery, beginning in 1983 when he joined the team at The Buttery as the Art Therapist and counsellor. In 1987 Barry moved into management, and was offered the position of Director in 1988, a position he held until his retirement from The Buttery in July 2014.

Barry was one of the founding members of the ATCA and has worked diligently since that time to maintain and develop the TC method of treatment. In particular, he has spearheaded the association’s work in the development of the ATCA Standard, and it is therefore very fitting that he will be maintain some of this work – even in his “so called” retirement.

Barry has been Director and Chair of the ATCA Board over a number of years, has served on the NADA Board and has been an active member of a number of organisations in the Northern Rivers. In 2009, Barry was inducted into the National Drug and Alcohol Awards Honour Roll.

Wesley Noffs entered the field in 1986 as manager of Life Education Australia, and in 1987 after his father, Ted Noffs, suffered a massive stroke, Wes took up the leadership role of that organisation. By 1990 it was evident that Youth Treatment was an under-resourced area, if not, non-existent. Wes, together with his wife, Amanda, felt compelled to focus on evidence-based treatment and turned the Wayside Foundation into the Ted Noffs Foundation.

Wes has had a long-term commitment to evidence based, accountable and accessible services for young people and has guided Ted Noffs through changes which have impacted on the AOD, youth and related fields as a whole, providing an ever-improving benchmark for good practice and accountability. Ted Noffs now works collaboratively across Australia to provide outreach evidence based, specialised care to rural, urban, indigenous and culturally and linguistically diverse youth and their families.

In 1999 the Ted Noffs Awards were established to honour outstanding individual and organisational contributions in the AOD field and in 2003, and these were followed the National Drug and Alcohol Awards as a collaboration between Ted Noffs, the Alcohol and other Drugs Council of Australia (ADCA), the Australian Drug Foundation (ADF) and the Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD).

Mandy Noffs has 45 years management experience, and in 1988 joined the Life Education Centre as Public Relations Officer. In 1990 Mandy joined Wes and turned the Wayside Foundation into Ted Noffs Foundation. Since 1990 she has played a critical role in the ongoing development of Ted Noffs Foundation and its programs. Amanda was the Chief Operating Officer up until July 2014.

Mandy has also served as a Board member of the Network of Alcohol & Other Drugs Agencies (NADA) and as a Board Member of Greenpeace Asia Pacific, and alongside Wes has pioneered rehabilitation services for adolescents in Australia and is proud to have built an organisation that continues to grow and help young people in need.

ATCA is fortunate to have had these three pioneers leading the way over a number of years, and fortunately it seems that we will be able to retain their expertise and knowledge for a little while yet from a true ‘retirement’.

On behalf of the membership, we extend congratulations and appreciation for the commitment of Barry, Wes and Mandy.

 __________________________________________________________________________________

2013 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • The Salvation Army – Bridge Program

In Recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Major David Pullen – The Salvation Army Recovery Services
  •  

 _____________________________________________________________________________________

2012 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Palmerston Association Farm Therapeutic Community– Chiropractic Program.
  • Cyrenian House– for the ongoing development of Cultural Competency within the context of the mainstream TC.

In Recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Charlie Blatch – Goldbridge – for his significant service to the TC sector over the past 40 years.

______________________________________________________________________________________ 

2011 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Saranna Women’s and Children’s Program – Cyrenian House WA

In Recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Carol Daws – Cyrenian House WA
  • Murray Sutton – Mirikai, Gold Coast Drug Council Qld
  • James Macgregor – Mirikai, Gold Coast Drug Council Qld

 _____________________________________________________________________________________

2009 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Alcohol & Other Drug Foundation ACT (ADFACT) – Early Birds Project
  • The Ted Noffs Foundation – Program for Adolescent Life Management (PALM)

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Gerard Byrne – Salvation Army Recovery Services
  • Kim Fleming – Karralika, ADFACT

______________________________________________________________________________________________

2008 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Alcohol & other Drug Foundation ACT (ADFACT) – Karralika Karuna Program
  • Palmerston Farm Vocational Program
  • Higher Ground Rehabilitation Trust

In Recognition of a significant contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Johnny Dow – Higher Ground Rehabilitation Trust
  • Kay Welsh – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Meridy Calnin – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Lynne Magor-Blatch – ADFACT Karralika